Tag Archives: Jewish Holidays 2015

September 2015 Jewish Holidays

SHOFARRosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah begins sunset on Sunday, September 13, 2015  Ends nightfall on Tuesday, September 15, 2015

The festival of Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year. It is the anniversary of the creation of Adam and Eve, and a Day of Judgment and coronation of God as king.
The central observance of Rosh Hashanah is the sounding of the shofar, the ram’s horn, which also represents the trumpet blast of a people’s coronation of their king. The cry of the shofar is also a call to repentance, for Rosh Hashanah is also the anniversary of man’s first sin and his repentance.
And as with every major Jewish holiday, after candle lighting and prayers the kiddush (a blessing recited over wine or grape juice to sanctify the Shabbat and Jewish holidays) is cited and make a blessing on the challah (a special Jewish braided bread eaten on Sabbath and Jewish holidays).

Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur begins sunset on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 and
ends nightfall on Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Yom Kippur is the holiest day of the year, the day on which we are closest to God and to the quintessence of our own souls. It is the Day of Atonement-“For on this day He will forgive you, to purify you, that you be cleansed from all your sins before God” (Leviticus 16:30).
For nearly twenty-six hours, from several minutes before sunset to after nightfall, we “afflict our souls”: we abstain from food and drink, do not wash or anoint our bodies, do not wear leather footwear, and abstain from marital relations.
Before Yom Kippur we perform the Kaparot atonement service; we request and receive honey cake, in acknowledgement that we are all recipients in God’s world, and in prayerful hope for a sweet and abundant year; eat a festive meal and give extra charity. In the late afternoon we eat the pre-fast meal, following which we bless our children, light a memorial candle as well as the holiday candles, and go to the synagogue for the Kol Nidrei service. In the course of Yom Kippur we hold five prayer services
The day is the most solemn of the year, yet an undertone of joy suffuses it: a joy that revels in the spirituality of the day and expresses the confidence that God will accept our repentance, forgive our sins, and seal our verdict for a year of life, health and happiness.

Sukkot

Sukkot begins sunset on Sunday, September 27, 2015
Ends nightfall on Sunday, October 4, 2015
The Hebrew word sukkōt is the plural of sukkah, “booth” or “tabernacle”, which is a walled structure covered with plant material such as overgrowth or palm leaves. A sukkah is the name of the temporary dwelling in which farmers would live during harvesting, a fact connecting to the agricultural significance of the holiday stress
Sukkot is an eight-day holiday, with the first day celebrated as a full festival with special prayer services and holiday meals. The seventh day of Sukkot is called Hoshana Rabbah (“Great Hoshana”, referring to the tradition that worshipers in the synagogue walk around the perimeter of the sanctuary during morning services) and has a special observance of its own. Outside Israel, the first and last two days are celebrated as full festivals. The intermediate days are known as Chol HaMoed (“festival weekdays”). According to Halakha, some types of work are forbidden during Chol HaMoed. In Israel many businesses are closed during this time.[4]
Throughout the week of Sukkot, meals are eaten in the sukkah and the males sleep there, although the requirement is waived in case of rain. Every day, a blessing is recited.
Building a sukkah [edit]
The sukkah walls can be constructed of any material (wood, canvas, aluminum siding, sheets). The walls can be free-standing or include the sides of a building or porch. The roof must be of organic material, known as s’chach, such as leafy tree overgrowth, schach (palm leaves, bamboo sticks or pine tree branches) mats or palm fronds. It is customary to decorate the interior of the sukkah with hanging decorations.

Advertisements